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Bit of HiStory: Color Blind

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Bit of HiStory is a new monthly column celebrating the rich history of Clark County.

In Fort Vancouver’s 19th century glory days of the Hudson’s Bay Company, the trading post was a cosmopolitan spot in the great dense forest. So many races, nationalities and ethnic groups were here, including Chinook, French, Hawaiians, Canadians, that for a time the official language was Wawa, the Chinookian trade jargon.

Fast forward a hundred years or so, and Vancouver’s previously ethnically diverse population had changed to almost exclusively Caucasian. The exceptions were a few Klickitat villages scattered along the Lewis River, an African American blacksmith in Battle Ground, and a black man named Robert Kimbrough who ran a shoe shine and shoe repair business in the Evergreen Hotel.

In February 1942, as the dark clouds of war hung over Europe and Asia, Henry Kaiser announced that he was building a shipyard on the Columbia River. By July of that year, Vancouver’s population of 18,000 had swelled to 85,000. The city’s single verified African American resident had been joined by over 2,000.

Vancouver was bursting its boundaries, so a Housing Authority was formed to provide living space for the incoming residents. Portland formed a comparable coalition to build homes for their shipyard workers. However, there the similarities between the sister cities ended.

To read more, pick up a copy of the January 2018 issue at any of these locations, or view the digital archive copy here.

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About Author

Pat Jollota retired from the Los Angeles Police Department and came to Vancouver to find a new career in historic preservation. She was curator of education at the Clark County Historical Museum for 22 years, while almost concurrently serving for 20 years on the Vancouver City Council.

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